Denver is Strange

A HISTORY THING

Denver on February 23, 1947:

Bob Huff reads a dime novel, titled Fancy Frank of Colorado in the Western History department of the Denver Public Library. DPL’s Western History Collection opened to the public in 1935. Today, it’s one of the world’s leading research centers for Colorado history and the history of the American West (and it’s also where a lot of the images on this Tumblr come from). Go visit. The people who work there are great, and they want to help you.

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)

Denver on February 23, 1947:

Bob Huff reads a dime novel, titled Fancy Frank of Colorado in the Western History department of the Denver Public Library. DPL’s Western History Collection
opened to the public in 1935. Today, it’s one of the world’s leading research centers for Colorado history and the history of the American West (and it’s also where a lot of the images on this Tumblr come from). Go visit. The people who work there are great, and they want to help you.

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)

Denver on February 21, 1970:

Candy-colored women in matching miniskirts and neckties promote financial services at a bridal fair in Denver. 

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)
Denver on February 21, 1931:

Denver masons, wearing their weird Mason aprons, lay the cornerstone of the City and County Building. One of the last major buildings in Denver’s Civic Center to be built, the City and County Building opened in 1932.

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)

Denver on February 21, 1931:

Denver masons, wearing their weird
Mason aprons, lay the cornerstone of the City and County Building. One of the last major buildings in Denver’s Civic Center to be built, the City and County Building opened in 1932.

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)

Denver on February 19, 1933:

The body of north Denver grocer and gangster Joseph “Little Joe” Roma lies on the floor of his parlor. Roma was playing his mandolin when other gangsters shot him 14 times.

(Photo via Denver Public Library Western History Collection)
Postcard announcing the opening of the “absolutely fireproof” Hotel Argonaut, on Capitol Hill next to the state capitol. For decades, the Argonaut was where out-of-town legislators stayed, along with other people who came to Denver to construct state business.

The Argonaut managed to stave off demolition, thankfully, unlike so many other hotels that were once in this part of downtown or Capitol Hill. The building is now a residence for senior citizens and home to both Phonatic and Shish Kabob Grill (and, oh, yes, the odd little Argonant [sic] Groceries convenience store.)

(In case you’re wondering, the term “argonaut” refers to someone who goes traveling for gold [i.e., Jason and the Argonauts]. Historically, the term was sometimes used to describe migrants to Colorado during the gold rushes of the 1850s and 1860s. You still see remnants of the term here and there in Denver, like the building above, or the name of east-central Denver’s greatest liquor store.)

Postcard announcing the opening of the “absolutely fireproof” Hotel Argonaut, on Capitol Hill next to the state capitol. For decades, the Argonaut was where out-of-town legislators stayed, along with other people who came to Denver to construct state business.

The Argonaut managed to stave off demolition, thankfully, unlike so many other hotels that were once in this part of downtown or Capitol Hill. The building is now a
residence for senior citizens and home to both Phonatic and Shish Kabob Grill (and, oh, yes, the odd little Argonant [sic] Groceries convenience store.)

(In case you’re wondering, the term “argonaut” refers to someone who goes traveling for gold [i.e., Jason and the Argonauts]. Historically, the term was sometimes used to describe migrants to Colorado during the gold rushes of the 1850s and 1860s. You still see remnants of the term here and there in Denver, like the building above, or the name of east-central Denver’s greatest liquor store.)

Happy Valentine’s Day! Let’s all take some time to remember our shared love: the City and County of Denver.

(Also, there should be more Denver-themed Valentines — this one is pretty great, but it’s the only one I could find [and it’s technically not even a Valentine’s card])

 (Image via PaperPlatesPress)